2017 UNSW TEACHING 'EVERY PIECE MATTERS' STUDENT WORK

Studio Tutors: Rob Brown, Carly Martin + Jed Long

2017 | ARCH 7111 Design Studio 1

UNSW Masters of Architecture Program Architecture + Design

This is real life project for RAW Impact (Raising Awareness Worldwide) an Australian nongovernmentalorganisation (NGO) working in Cambodia, sited near the Mekong River outside of Phnom Penh. The RAW Impact organization seeks to ‘raise awareness worldwide’ by creating powerful change through sustainable projects in Cambodia. This is done by teams of volunteers from high schools, universities and corporate businesses assisting the poorest rural communities by hands on building projects including schools, community buildings, housing as well as providing education for teachers, agricultural projects health, sanitation and water resources.

 With the rapidly expanding city of Phnom Penh outlying villages are being engulfed as suburbs of the city, many of these villages on the outskirts of the city are slums whose occupants do not own the land they live on. The government policy is to relocate these slum dwellers to a distant agricultural part of the country as part of any redevelopment of the city surrounds. RAW has built a school and individual housing for these slum dwellers to date. In these buildings, RAW has increasingly been looking to use bamboo, which has the potential to be an affordable, sustainable building material for their projects.

Cambodia is home to some of Southeast Asia’s oldest forests, and is losing them through illegal clearing at a rate of 2000 square kilometres every year. This deforestation has seen Cambodia’s rainforest cover decrease from 70% in 1970 to 3% today. Bamboo is a strong, versatile building material that has the potential to largely replace timber products in the construction industry, particularly in Cambodia. RAW is currently sourcing their bamboo externally, but as the growth cycle of bamboo is very short (only a few years), RAW wants to grow and process all their own bamboo. This will also help to reduce costs for their construction projects, allowing them to help even more people. In order to do this, RAW will need to construct a bamboo workshop and factory, which will allow them to process the bamboo to use in construction.

For this project, students will need to develop a comprehensive understanding of the process of planting, growing, harvesting and processing bamboo. It is through this knowledge that the brief for the bamboo workshop will be developed. Students will be asked in groups to develop a comprehensive flow chart for understanding the processing of bamboo.

The workshop/factory building is to be built using mainly bamboo, but students may also choose to use supplementary materials in their design. In addition to this, students will be required to design and build a piece of bamboo furniture or an item which could be produced in their bamboo factory.

Student Work:

Jincheng Jiang

Awards: Renzo Piano Award in Architecture

Siyue Zhang

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2015 UNSW GRADUATION PROJECT | 'EXCAVATING THE EDGE: KALGOORLIE SUPERPIT'

Work by Jessica Gottlieb | Graduate Architect at Casey Brown Architecture

2015 | ARCH 7201 Graduation Studio

UNSW Masters of Architecture Program Architecture + Design

Initially responding to a studio brief for unconventional housing -  

‘Excavating the Edge’ responds to the challenge of exploring a totally new kind of city, one that shifts from Australia’s densely populated coast to its under - utilised centre.

The city of Kalgoorlie-Boulder is 600km inland from Perth. Along its eastern fringe lies the KCGM Superpit, the world’s fourth largest open cut gold mine. 4km long, 1.5km wide and 600 metres deep, it forms a deep scar in the earth. Its decommissioning in 2021 provides a unique opportunity for rejuvenation.

The design itself is a two-faced puncturing of a man-made berm that currently lines the pit edge and presents a closed wall to the city. All new cut is re-constituted as a multi-functioning rammed earth wall that connects the entire edge. Driven by economic, social, environmental and material imperatives, and serving both private and public uses, the intervention extends and links the city to the pit, suggesting and promoting future growth.

There is an inherent contrast of scale evident in the design, whereby a barren expanse has been broken down, remediated and repurposed. Significant vertical and horizontal relationships are established. Responding to the crudely cut pit, a series of fine geometric edge excavations articulate unconventional, semi-subterranean housing typologies that filter into semi-private courtyards, which open onto public spaces.

The proposal both celebrates and provides protection from the desert climate. It is powered by a solar road / proposed bushwalking track that runs through the mine, and recycles all grey- and black-water. Providing a major economic driver for Kalgoorlie are climate-specific, food-producing greenhouses that utilise the pit groundwater as the primary water source.

The intervention is inherently social, totally self-sustainable and economically viable as an agricultural producer. ‘Excavating the Edge’ represents one exploration of repurposing an exceptional outback landscape for future urban settlement. The potential for similar intervention into other dramatic sites provides future architectural food for thought. 

 

Awards: -

Masters Graduate of the Year UNSW – Australian Institute of Architects NSW Chapter 2017

RIBA Presidents Silver Medal - Royal Institute of British Architects 2017 (Nominated)

NSW Design Medal- Australian Institute of Architects NSW Chapter 2016 (Nominated)

Margot + Neville Gruzman Award for Urban Design - UNSW 2016

 

 
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2016 UNSW TEACHING - RAW IMPACT 'EVERY PIECE MATTERS' STUDENT WORK

Studio Tutors: Rob Brown & Carly Martin

2016 | ARCH 7111 Design Studio 2

UNSW Masters of Architecture Program Architecture + Design

 

This design studio takes a worldwide view of architecture, and emphasises the important role which architecture can play in assisting communities in need.


The studio will examine the variety of prospects offered by bamboo in architecture, in particular investigating the work of Colombian architect Simón Vélez, who famously described bamboo as “the vegetable alternative to steel”. Perhaps less well known is that other architects including Buckminster Fuller, Frei Otto, Renzo Piano, Toyo Ito and Arata Isozaki also experimented with the versatile material, despite bamboo’s reputation as “the poor man’s wood”.


Over one billion people in the world live in bamboo houses in Asia, Latin America and Africa. In addition to houses, it has been used to make bridges and other buildings, and can be processed to be eaten, fed, exported, turned into paper, used in furniture or even turned into musical instruments. It is a low-tech material with high innovative potential.


Bamboo is affordable, sustainable, lightweight, flexible, and can be easily manipulated - how can it be developed into the architecture of the 21st century?


This project involves designing a self-sufficient community for 100 families using bamboo as the principal building material, as well as associated community buildings (kindergarten, iconic community sheds).

 

Student Work:

Mengying Li

 

Junyue Xia

2016 UNSW TEACHING – RAW IMPACT ‘EVERY PIECE MATTERS’ - Student's Work

Over one billion people in the world live in bamboo houses in Asia, Latin America and Africa.  In addition to houses, it has been used to make bridges and other buildings, and can be processed to be eaten, fed, exported, turned into paper, used in furniture or even turned into musical instruments.  It is a low-tech material with high innovative potential. 

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